It’s a long road to be forgiven

I have seen the Indigo Girls in every city I’ve lived in except Atlanta, which is pretty funny considering that’s where they and I are all from.

Their Dublin show last night was fantastic, probably the best concert I’ve seen them give. This is really saying something, considering Emily (half of the duo) was sick and barely able to sing. She soldiered through, performing a face-melting guitar solo on Chickenman. Other high points included: Amy’s solo, which had me on the edge of my seat for every note, the cover of Thin Line I thought I’d never hear live, a collaborative effort on a cover of Redemption Song, and many of the old favourites.

Of the four times I’ve seen the Indigo Girls live, I’ve dragged the Wanderer to three of them. I’ve brought him to concerts he only marginally enjoyed, but he suffers it gracefully. He seemed to enjoy it, especially Chickenman,*¬† but I was still shocked when I heard him (one of roughly five men in the audience) singing along to one of the encore songs. (It was Redemption Song. So it made some sense that he knew it. I didn’t know that at the time.) This is the second time I’ve dragged him to a concert only to turn and gape when he started singing along.

I made some changes based on what I’d learned from previous concerts. Last time, I walked away thinking I needed to get my hands on some of their new stuff. Learning that lesson, I picked up the new CD from the merch stand (as well as a t-shirt, the first concert shirt I’ve gotten in a while). This concert was the first time, however, I’ve walked out thinking I really should have recorded it. The guitar solos were that damn good.

The promoters switched the venue at the last minute, from the Tripod to Vicar Street. I was so happy I did a victory dance when I read the mail — not only is it a better venue for this kind of show, but it’s so close to where I live that even if you drive to the concert you will still walk farther than I have to walk to get there. I could not have asked for a better evening.

*When we realised Chickenman was only the penultimate song of the set, he leaned over and asked “How are they going to top that?”

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Just a note

Dear Ireland,

I don’t have a horse in this race. Really. And I will love you no matter what you do, even if I question your reasoning sometimes. Please don’t embarrass me tomorrow. Remember that everything was going really well until you voted down the¬†Lisbon treaty last year, and consider how awesome it is that you have a chance to change your mind.

Love, Dixie

I have been watching the debates over the Lisbon treaty with interest, and the increasingly hysterical campaign posters all over town sometimes make me laugh. (More often they make me worry.) One of my coworkers in the yarn shop had the best summary of the debate I have heard or read anywhere: both sides seem to be motivated by fear. The No people are afraid Ireland will flush its rights, freedoms, and national sovereignty down the European toilet. The Yes people are afraid Ireland will return to its ancestral status as a barely functioning backwater. As with most debates, I can see where both sides are coming from and I think the truth, as always, somewhere in between.

I am cautiously hopeful.